Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

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Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby cml-2012 » Tue Jul 02, 2013 8:32 am

Ecosystem Crisis...

The Cause is unknown.

Source: The Extinction Protocol - 2012 and Beyond

When the bees are extinct on this planet, we have a few years left, and then most of us will be gone as well.

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress. ... nprotocol/
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Re: Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby farmer_dude48 » Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:00 pm

I read about this on the extinction protocol today its really scary stuff.. Whats really bad IMO is the company's that are producing the seed that they think is doing this just doesn't care. :evil:
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Re: Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby cml-2012 » Wed Jul 03, 2013 6:11 pm

farmer dude,

It is scary. No, they don't care. The seed corn is poison to the bees.

Three years ago I began growing Australian tea tree plants. I'm sure you've heard of them. I ordered the seeds from Sand Mountain, and started them in my greenhouse. The plants have done really well. The trees are about 2 feet tall. The bark is red and gnarly, just like a real tea tree. I have them growing in big planters, and in August, I'm going to plant them in a old orchard that belongs to a friend of mine. The bees in New Zealand feed on the blossoms of the Manuka and Kanuka trees, and the honey the bees produce is much different than regular honey. This "Manuka Honey" is germicidal, antibiotic, antiseptic, you name it. My plan is to help the native bees build up an immunity to GMO plants, by feeding on the nectar from the Tea tree plants. They're different plants, the Tea trees, and the Manuka/Kanuka, but both of them produce Tea tree oil, Manuka oil, and of course the honey.

I'll go through my files and post some links. I'm going to help the bees if I can. It may be too late, but I have to try and do something.

Thank you for the comment.

This may be of interest to you:

Tea Trees and Their Therapeutic Properties:

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/f-w98/teatrees.html


This blog has information on growing the Tea Tree

http://mysticalmagicalherbs.wordpress.c ... -tea-tree/
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Re: Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby Mordae » Thu Jul 04, 2013 2:01 am

This "Manuka Honey" is germicidal, antibiotic, antiseptic, you name it.


Quick tip I got from a mate who keeps bee's. The Manuka Honey gets more powerful the longer it is left, he generally keeps his sealed for a year at least before sending it off for sale, as the sale price is rated on how powerful the honey is.
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Re: Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby farmer_dude48 » Thu Jul 04, 2013 6:50 pm

Mordae

I don't really know what to do for the bee's around here. We planted more flowers and I thought about putting out bowls of sugar water. We do seem to have more bee's this year ( Thank God ). Maybe I should check with our County Agent this week and see if there are other ways to feed them.

To be honest I haven't heard of the Manuka Honey. I would love to try it sometime most of the Honey we have around here comes from Clover.
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Re: Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby Mordae » Fri Jul 05, 2013 2:09 am

Got a couple of idea's you could try

- Keep a portion on your honey take aside to feed back to the bees over winter, it's probably healthier than the sugar water. This link has a couple of alternatives but just bear in mind that some of them may be GMO or have other effects later.
http://www.ehow.com/list_6301878_alternatives-sugar-water-feeding-bees.html

- Make sure your hive has a variety of brood sizes. Most of the premade brood chambers are for the biggest sized bees (size 5 from memory?), but I suspect each size type of bee performs a slightly different function in Hive upkeep

- plant low edges running out from the hive. Use species with different flowering times. This will allow the bees to get out in bad weather to forage. Plant flowing ground cover under the hedge as well for a double effect.

- If you can locate it, try putting in a small grove of either Black Locust or Honey Locust trees. The hive will need to be a minimum of 100 feet away from it if I remember correctly, but it's a good source of food to tide them over winter. You can also coppice the Black Locust for fencepoles as required.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_American_nectar_sources_for_honey_bees

The thread on the 2013 site had some good links in it as well
http://2013.org/showthread.php/352-Bee-Keeping
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Re: Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby Mordae » Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:36 am

Here's the latest research update on bee deaths

http://www.care2.com/causes/heres-whats-killing-bees-and-why-were-all-screwed.html
...While previous research has found correlations between pesticide use and bee fatalities, what makes this new study unique is the in depth autopsy performed on affected bees. Specifically, scientists looked at the combination of toxins with which the bees were dealing. The average pollen sample contained nine different pesticides and fungicides, though one test was found to include 21 such chemicals.

This chemical exposure is too much for most bees to contend with, leaving them particularly weak and susceptible to parasites. Putting this theory to the test, researchers gave pesticide-laden pollen to healthy bees and found they were no longer able to withstand infections...
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Re: Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby cml-2012 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 2:42 pm

Movie trailer about the importance of the Honey bee in our food supply chain...

http://www.morethanhoneyfilm.com/

BBC Documentary - run time - 58:50

Who Killed the Honey Bee?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjef4QiKWfg
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Re: Bees Dying By The Millions In Canada

Postby Mordae » Fri Sep 27, 2013 1:29 am

Worth the watch (video is in the link)...

Why the Bees are disappearing
Back in 2007, when the words ‘Colony Collapse Disorder’ first hit the media spotlight, I wrote an article that sought to steer through all the reductionist scientific responses — where scientists and the public sought silver bullet solutions by trying to pinpoint a single cause for the mysterious and globally widespread disappearance of millions of bees — to share my thoughts that CCD was not caused by just a single issue, but instead by a number of issues. I tried to illustrate this web of inter-related issues using the example of a wheel — that a wheel can continue with one or two missing spokes, but if you continue to remove more, then eventually the wheel will collapse (there’s that word again), and you’ll, rather ungracefully, hit the dirt.


Each application of the industrial, factory floor mindset to the otherwise healthy existence of a bee, is one more spoke removal. And, as I expressed in that article, we should also recognise that bees are not the only pollinators out there, but most of those have already disappeared from our flower-, fragrance- and diversity-free landscapes, leaving us vulnerably dependent on just one kind of pollinator — the industrially manipulated European honeybee. (As an aside, my article was repeating plagiarised by Brit Amos here.)

In the video above (see link), Marla Spivak, University of Minnesota professor of entomology, having a lifetime of experience with bees, covers the same territory. In short, in my view, too many scientists are focusing only on the bee — when they, and we, need to seriously focus on the failure of our present, globalised, monoculture food systems. Only until we address these systemic issues, will we find that our problems, rather than the bees, will ‘mysteriously disappear’….
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